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VOHC Approved – Treats

In this blog, we talk about dental treats and your pet!

Why should I purchase my pet dental treats from my veterinarian?

At Southampton Pet Hospital, we make sure that all of our dental chews carry the Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC) Seal of Acceptance. This seal can only be found on products that meet the VOHC’s strict standards. The VOHC Seal of Acceptance can provide the piece of mind that the product you intend to use will help to control the plaque and tartar levels on your pet’s teeth. You can be sure the product does what it claims!

The VOHC was created in the 1980s following the annual meeting of the American Veterinary Dental Society, the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry and the American Veterinary Dental College. Ten years later, the American Veterinary Dental Society recruited representatives from the American Animal Hospital Association, American Dental Association, American Veterinary Medical Association, and the US Food and Drug Administration – Centre for Veterinary Medicine to further fine tune the VOHC processes. A lot of research, review, and revamping took place throughout years. The final result is a formal council of 9 veterinary dental experts (veterinary dentists and dental scientists) that receive no remuneration for their services. It wasn’t until 1998 that the VOHC felt ready to award their first seal of acceptance.

To be awarded the VOHC Seal of Acceptance; a series of trials are preformed. The minimum trial period for a product is 28 days; with a total of 5 research/study groups. Each study group receives the same number of pets (randomized subjects are a requirement, however, must be of similar age and weight), with the same dental score, and all pets are placed on the same control diet (of dry food). Before any study taking place; a full physical examination of each pet participant takes place (including CBC, chemistry panel and urinalysis). The overall dental score is determined as the result of both tartar and gingivitis scores. The dental score also takes into consideration the existing mobility of teeth and any “non-gingival” ulceration or mucosal laceration. For more information, you can review the Trial Protocol – Dental Requirements

The result is a product that you can be sure will be beneficial to your pets oral health.

Written By: Melanie Hamilton, Customer Care Representative

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